#WorldHijabDay VS #NoHijabDay: Are These Two Opposing Campaigns Inciting Hate Instead of Freedom?

Published February 2nd, 2020 - 10:13 GMT
Are #WorldHijabDay and ##NoHijabDay Be Fuelling Hatred and Racism Instead of Celebrating Freedom of Choice?
Other social media users noted that hashtag users should focus more on celebrating women's right to choose what to wear and what not to wear. (Twitter)

Even though #WorldHijabDay celebrated annually of the 1st of February by hijab-wearing Muslim women was meant to "fight discrimination against Muslim women who wear the headcover," the hashtag and its counter-movement #NoHijabDay or #FreeFromHijab launched to protest compulsory hijab, seemed to stir a heated exchange of accusations and hateful comments instead.

Being celebrated for the 7th year in a row, World Hijab Day was founded by a Muslim American woman called Nazma Khan. Khan explains on her website that her decision was a response to the rising hate sentiment against Muslims post 9/11, especially women who wear religious symbols like the hijab, saying that they face discrimination because of their Muslim-looking attire. 

Meanwhile, Twitter activists launched counter campaigns calling for women's freedom to not wear hijab especially in Iran, where it's a compulsory practice and taking it off is considered a punishable "violation of law". Even though the hijab isn't required by law in other Muslim-majority countries, many women still report being forced to wear it, in addition to facing abuse and threats when they choose to not to wear it.

Using the Hashtags #NoHijabDay and #FreeFromHijab, ex-hijabi women shared personal anecdotes of the times they were forced to wear the headcover and reactions to their decisions to take it off.

People also shared videos of women taking the hijab off in Iran, saluting their courage to stand against laws and social restrictions, while others called on women who wear the hijab to take it off and to stop celebrating "symbols of misogyny and subjugation."

Some social media users noted that hashtag users should focus more on celebrating women's right to choose what to wear and what not to wear all around the world, instead of it being a chance for both sides to attack each other for their choices, fueling hatred and racism.


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