10 Best Countries for Women

Published May 8th, 2019 - 08:00 GMT

 

The Best Countries for Women is a perception-based ranking based on the responses of nearly 9,000 women who filled out surveys for the 2019 Best Countries rankings.

The ranking is derived from a compilation of five equally weighted country attributes: care about human rights, gender equality, income equality, progress and safety.

According to the survey, these are the 10 best countries for women.

View as a slider
View as a list
1. Sweden: 12 of the 22 government ministers are women in Sweden. And nearly half of the members of the current parliament in Sweden are also women.

1. Sweden: 12 of the 22 government ministers are women in Sweden. And nearly half of the members of the current parliament in Sweden are also women. (Shutterstock)

2. Denmark: Denmark has some of the world's lowest income inequality. And when it comes to gender equality, women play a prominent role in business, while men get involved in childraising.

2. Denmark: Denmark has some of the world's lowest income inequality. And when it comes to gender equality, women play a prominent role in business, while men get involved in childraising. (Shutterstock)

3. Canada: Canada has a longstanding commitment to gender equality. Over the past three years, the federal government strengthened the gender governance framework through developing institutions, policies, tools and accountability structures to promote gender equality and mainstreaming.

3. Canada: Canada has a longstanding commitment to gender equality. Over the past three years, the federal government strengthened the gender governance framework through developing institutions, policies, tools and accountability structures to promote gender equality and mainstreaming. (Shutterstock)

4. Norway:Norway is considered to be one of the most gender equal countries in the world. Still, a number of challenges to gender equality remain and new gender issues keep surfacing.

4. Norway:Norway is considered to be one of the most gender equal countries in the world. Still, a number of challenges to gender equality remain and new gender issues keep surfacing. (Shutterstock)

5. Netherlands: There has been public commitment to gender equality reflected in the Netherland’s over 25-year old Emancipation policy which strives to achieve equality in employment, salaries, education and private life.

5. Netherlands: There has been public commitment to gender equality reflected in the Netherland’s over 25-year old Emancipation policy which strives to achieve equality in employment, salaries, education and private life. (Shutterstock)

6. Finland: Finland was the first country to grant full political rights to women in 1906. For more than 100 years women have had active roles in working life and decision making. Today, 49% of all employed people are women.

6. Finland: Finland was the first country to grant full political rights to women in 1906. For more than 100 years women have had active roles in working life and decision making. Today, 49% of all employed people are women. (Shutterstock)

7. Switzerland: Switzerland shows the greatest room for improvement when it comes to economic participation, specifically the ratio of men and women in senior positions such as legislators, senior officials, and managers.

7. Switzerland: Switzerland shows the greatest room for improvement when it comes to economic participation, specifically the ratio of men and women in senior positions such as legislators, senior officials, and managers. (Shutterstock)

8. Australia: In recent decades, women in Australia have made significant strides towards equality with men. At universities, in workplaces, in boardrooms and in government, a growing number of women have taken on leadership roles, forging pathways for other women and girls to follow.

8. Australia: In recent decades, women in Australia have made significant strides towards equality with men. At universities, in workplaces, in boardrooms and in government, a growing number of women have taken on leadership roles, forging pathways for other women and girls to follow. (Shutterstock)

9. New Zealand: New Zealand has closed 79 percent of its overall gender pay gap, putting it at ninth place.

9. New Zealand: New Zealand has closed 79 percent of its overall gender pay gap, putting it at ninth place. (Shutterstock)

10. Germany: In recent years, Germany has pushed the ‘women’s quota’ law aimed at closing its wage and achievement gaps. It obliges Germany’s largest companies to ensure 30 percent of all supervisory board positions are held by women.

10. Germany: In recent years, Germany has pushed the ‘women’s quota’ law aimed at closing its wage and achievement gaps. It obliges Germany’s largest companies to ensure 30 percent of all supervisory board positions are held by women. (Shutterstock)

1. Sweden: 12 of the 22 government ministers are women in Sweden. And nearly half of the members of the current parliament in Sweden are also women.
2. Denmark: Denmark has some of the world's lowest income inequality. And when it comes to gender equality, women play a prominent role in business, while men get involved in childraising.
3. Canada: Canada has a longstanding commitment to gender equality. Over the past three years, the federal government strengthened the gender governance framework through developing institutions, policies, tools and accountability structures to promote gender equality and mainstreaming.
4. Norway:Norway is considered to be one of the most gender equal countries in the world. Still, a number of challenges to gender equality remain and new gender issues keep surfacing.
5. Netherlands: There has been public commitment to gender equality reflected in the Netherland’s over 25-year old Emancipation policy which strives to achieve equality in employment, salaries, education and private life.
6. Finland: Finland was the first country to grant full political rights to women in 1906. For more than 100 years women have had active roles in working life and decision making. Today, 49% of all employed people are women.
7. Switzerland: Switzerland shows the greatest room for improvement when it comes to economic participation, specifically the ratio of men and women in senior positions such as legislators, senior officials, and managers.
8. Australia: In recent decades, women in Australia have made significant strides towards equality with men. At universities, in workplaces, in boardrooms and in government, a growing number of women have taken on leadership roles, forging pathways for other women and girls to follow.
9. New Zealand: New Zealand has closed 79 percent of its overall gender pay gap, putting it at ninth place.
10. Germany: In recent years, Germany has pushed the ‘women’s quota’ law aimed at closing its wage and achievement gaps. It obliges Germany’s largest companies to ensure 30 percent of all supervisory board positions are held by women.
1. Sweden: 12 of the 22 government ministers are women in Sweden. And nearly half of the members of the current parliament in Sweden are also women.
1. Sweden: 12 of the 22 government ministers are women in Sweden. And nearly half of the members of the current parliament in Sweden are also women. (Shutterstock)
2. Denmark: Denmark has some of the world's lowest income inequality. And when it comes to gender equality, women play a prominent role in business, while men get involved in childraising.
2. Denmark: Denmark has some of the world's lowest income inequality. And when it comes to gender equality, women play a prominent role in business, while men get involved in childraising. (Shutterstock)
3. Canada: Canada has a longstanding commitment to gender equality. Over the past three years, the federal government strengthened the gender governance framework through developing institutions, policies, tools and accountability structures to promote gender equality and mainstreaming.
3. Canada: Canada has a longstanding commitment to gender equality. Over the past three years, the federal government strengthened the gender governance framework through developing institutions, policies, tools and accountability structures to promote gender equality and mainstreaming. (Shutterstock)
4. Norway:Norway is considered to be one of the most gender equal countries in the world. Still, a number of challenges to gender equality remain and new gender issues keep surfacing.
4. Norway:Norway is considered to be one of the most gender equal countries in the world. Still, a number of challenges to gender equality remain and new gender issues keep surfacing. (Shutterstock)
5. Netherlands: There has been public commitment to gender equality reflected in the Netherland’s over 25-year old Emancipation policy which strives to achieve equality in employment, salaries, education and private life.
5. Netherlands: There has been public commitment to gender equality reflected in the Netherland’s over 25-year old Emancipation policy which strives to achieve equality in employment, salaries, education and private life. (Shutterstock)
6. Finland: Finland was the first country to grant full political rights to women in 1906. For more than 100 years women have had active roles in working life and decision making. Today, 49% of all employed people are women.
6. Finland: Finland was the first country to grant full political rights to women in 1906. For more than 100 years women have had active roles in working life and decision making. Today, 49% of all employed people are women. (Shutterstock)
7. Switzerland: Switzerland shows the greatest room for improvement when it comes to economic participation, specifically the ratio of men and women in senior positions such as legislators, senior officials, and managers.
7. Switzerland: Switzerland shows the greatest room for improvement when it comes to economic participation, specifically the ratio of men and women in senior positions such as legislators, senior officials, and managers. (Shutterstock)
8. Australia: In recent decades, women in Australia have made significant strides towards equality with men. At universities, in workplaces, in boardrooms and in government, a growing number of women have taken on leadership roles, forging pathways for other women and girls to follow.
8. Australia: In recent decades, women in Australia have made significant strides towards equality with men. At universities, in workplaces, in boardrooms and in government, a growing number of women have taken on leadership roles, forging pathways for other women and girls to follow. (Shutterstock)
9. New Zealand: New Zealand has closed 79 percent of its overall gender pay gap, putting it at ninth place.
9. New Zealand: New Zealand has closed 79 percent of its overall gender pay gap, putting it at ninth place. (Shutterstock)
10. Germany: In recent years, Germany has pushed the ‘women’s quota’ law aimed at closing its wage and achievement gaps. It obliges Germany’s largest companies to ensure 30 percent of all supervisory board positions are held by women.
10. Germany: In recent years, Germany has pushed the ‘women’s quota’ law aimed at closing its wage and achievement gaps. It obliges Germany’s largest companies to ensure 30 percent of all supervisory board positions are held by women. (Shutterstock)