10 Cheapest Cities for Expats to Live In 2021

Published June 29th, 2021 - 10:47 GMT

Some cities in the world are now home to many expat workers for being not only affordable but also because of their mesmerizing landscape, easy arrangements for residency permits, good weather, and facilities that would make the life of expats much easier.

According to Mercer’s latest report, these are the 10 cheapest cities for expats to live in this year.

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10. Banjul - Gambia

10. Banjul: It is the capital, and Atlantic port of The Gambia. Banjul is The Gambia’s commercial and transportation centre. It has several peanut (groundnut) decorticating plants and oil mills; peanuts, peanut oil and meal, and palm kernels are exported. Tourism is of increasing importance, alleviating some of the urban unemployment problem and encouraging handicraft (wood carvings, filigree jewelry, hand-dyed cloth) industries.

9. Karachi - Pakistan

9. Karachi: It is the largest city in Pakistan and the twelfth-largest city in the world. Karachi handles the entire seaborne trade of Pakistan and of landlocked Afghanistan.

8. Gaborone -  Botswana

8. Gaborone: It is the capital city of Botswana. Botswana has a free market economy with a strong tradition of central government planning to provide infrastructure for private investment.

7. Tashkent - Uzbekistan

7. Tashkent: It is the capital city of Uzbekistan. Today, Tashkent is the main economic and cultural centre of Central Asia. Cotton is the chief crop of the region in which it is situated. Wheat, rice, jute, vegetables, and melons are also grown, and silkworms are bred.

6. Windhoek - Namibia

6. Windhoek: It is the capital of Namibia. Windhoek is the main commercial centre of Namibia, being linked by road and railway to the port of Walvis Bay and to South Africa.

5. Brasília - Brazil

5. Brasília: It was inaugurated as Brazil’s capital in 1960. The major roles of construction and of services (government, communications, banking and finance, food production, entertainment, and legal services) in Brasília’s economy reflect the city’s status as a governmental rather than an industrial centre.

4. Tunis - Tunisia

4. Tunis: It is the capital and largest city of the North African country, Tunisia. Agriculture remains a major source of income. Olives and cereals are the principal crops grown, and olive oil and foodstuffs are processed. Manufactures include textiles and clothing, carpets, and cement and metal building structures. There are also chemical (superphosphate), metallurgical, machine, and electrical industries and railway workshops. There are several thermoelectric plants at Ḥalq al-Wādī, and Maqrīn has a lead smelter. Tourism is of particular economic importance. Al-ʿUwaynah International Airport and the International Airport of Tunis-Carthage are located northeast of the city.

3. Tbilisi - Georgia

3. Tbilisi: It is the capital of the republic of Georgia. The city is a principal industrial centre of the region. Its engineering services are important in the production of electric locomotives, machine tools, agricultural machinery, and electrical equipment and in the repair of locomotives and rolling stock. Other industries make textiles; leather goods and footwear; furniture; beer, wine, and spirits; and a range of foodstuffs.

2. Lusaka - Zambia

2. Lusaka: It is the capital and largest city of Zambia. Although basically reliant on its agricultural environs, and a major collecting point for corn (maize) and tobacco, Lusaka has a mixed economy that includes cement, textile, and shoe manufacture, and food processing.

1. Bishkek - Kyrgyzstan

1. Bishkek: It is the capital of Kyrgyzstan. The city’s industry developed in two stages: until 1941, emphasis was on the food and other light industries using local raw materials; and, after the evacuation of heavy industries from western Russia during World War II, an extensive machine-building and metalworking industry came into being. Development was particularly rapid in the 1960s.

10. Banjul - Gambia
9. Karachi - Pakistan
8. Gaborone -  Botswana
7. Tashkent - Uzbekistan
6. Windhoek - Namibia
5. Brasília - Brazil
4. Tunis - Tunisia
3. Tbilisi - Georgia
2. Lusaka - Zambia
1. Bishkek - Kyrgyzstan
10. Banjul - Gambia
10. Banjul: It is the capital, and Atlantic port of The Gambia. Banjul is The Gambia’s commercial and transportation centre. It has several peanut (groundnut) decorticating plants and oil mills; peanuts, peanut oil and meal, and palm kernels are exported. Tourism is of increasing importance, alleviating some of the urban unemployment problem and encouraging handicraft (wood carvings, filigree jewelry, hand-dyed cloth) industries.
9. Karachi - Pakistan
9. Karachi: It is the largest city in Pakistan and the twelfth-largest city in the world. Karachi handles the entire seaborne trade of Pakistan and of landlocked Afghanistan.
8. Gaborone -  Botswana
8. Gaborone: It is the capital city of Botswana. Botswana has a free market economy with a strong tradition of central government planning to provide infrastructure for private investment.
7. Tashkent - Uzbekistan
7. Tashkent: It is the capital city of Uzbekistan. Today, Tashkent is the main economic and cultural centre of Central Asia. Cotton is the chief crop of the region in which it is situated. Wheat, rice, jute, vegetables, and melons are also grown, and silkworms are bred.
6. Windhoek - Namibia
6. Windhoek: It is the capital of Namibia. Windhoek is the main commercial centre of Namibia, being linked by road and railway to the port of Walvis Bay and to South Africa.
5. Brasília - Brazil
5. Brasília: It was inaugurated as Brazil’s capital in 1960. The major roles of construction and of services (government, communications, banking and finance, food production, entertainment, and legal services) in Brasília’s economy reflect the city’s status as a governmental rather than an industrial centre.
4. Tunis - Tunisia
4. Tunis: It is the capital and largest city of the North African country, Tunisia. Agriculture remains a major source of income. Olives and cereals are the principal crops grown, and olive oil and foodstuffs are processed. Manufactures include textiles and clothing, carpets, and cement and metal building structures. There are also chemical (superphosphate), metallurgical, machine, and electrical industries and railway workshops. There are several thermoelectric plants at Ḥalq al-Wādī, and Maqrīn has a lead smelter. Tourism is of particular economic importance. Al-ʿUwaynah International Airport and the International Airport of Tunis-Carthage are located northeast of the city.
3. Tbilisi - Georgia
3. Tbilisi: It is the capital of the republic of Georgia. The city is a principal industrial centre of the region. Its engineering services are important in the production of electric locomotives, machine tools, agricultural machinery, and electrical equipment and in the repair of locomotives and rolling stock. Other industries make textiles; leather goods and footwear; furniture; beer, wine, and spirits; and a range of foodstuffs.
2. Lusaka - Zambia
2. Lusaka: It is the capital and largest city of Zambia. Although basically reliant on its agricultural environs, and a major collecting point for corn (maize) and tobacco, Lusaka has a mixed economy that includes cement, textile, and shoe manufacture, and food processing.
1. Bishkek - Kyrgyzstan
1. Bishkek: It is the capital of Kyrgyzstan. The city’s industry developed in two stages: until 1941, emphasis was on the food and other light industries using local raw materials; and, after the evacuation of heavy industries from western Russia during World War II, an extensive machine-building and metalworking industry came into being. Development was particularly rapid in the 1960s.