6 Weirdest Video Games Ever Made

Published August 18th, 2020 - 11:49 GMT

We all know that video games might be weird but these 6 video games redefined weirdness! These games are not just weird but are also fun to play and are well worth trying out if you are after something a bit different.

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1. Katamari Damacy

1. Katamari Damacy: Katamari Damacy was created by artist and sculptor turned game designer, Keita Takahashi. The story goes like this: The King of the Cosmos had a bit too much to drink one night and destroyed the universe Now it falls on you to gather up everything using a sort of adhesive ball called a Katamari and restore the universe. It starts out small as your Katamari picks up household objects such as thumbtacks and paperclips but then progresses to much larger, more ridiculous things including cows and entire houses. Takahashi based the king’s physical appearance on Freddie Mercury and the game world he has created is both stylish and colourful.

2. Typing of the Dead

2. Typing of the Dead: There are not many games out there which utilise the PS2 and Dreamcast keyboards but if you’d like to try one out, Typing of the Dead is a great place to start. You’re under attack. There are hordes of zombies coming right towards you, but luckily you brought your most powerful weapon: your keyboard. That’s right, this is a horror learn-to-type game. To keep things interesting the zombies are all wielding keyboards too. Sentences you must type out include “I like peas” and “All your bases belong to us”.

3. Golf Story

3. Golf Story : Golf Story plays just like any other action RPG, but instead of worlds with different dungeons and towns to explore, there are golf courses with different terrains, other golfers to meet and side quests a plenty. Then there’s the combat: instead of fighting monsters with a sword (it’s dangerous to go alone!) or magic, you use a golf club. In fact, in the world of Golf Story there are very few problems which can’t be solved by hitting a golf ball at them. At first Golf Story feels like you are playing Mario Golf with JRPG-esque side quests, but as the game progresses the quests get weirder and weirder and soon you find yourself digging up golf courses (with a golf club, of course; as if you’d use a shovel) to look for buried treasure. Or using your precision golf ball hitting skills to defeat an undead army.

4. Clock Tower

4. Clock Tower: Imagine if Tim Burton and Dario Argento got together and created a point-and-click survival horror game. If they did, it would likely resemble Clock Tower, which feels like a blend of Phenomena and Edward Scissorhands. It centres around a Jennifer Connelly look alike who is an orphan adopted out and sent to live in a mansion known as The Clock Tower Upon arriving Jennifer quickly finds herself all alone. She must explore the spooky mansion and look for clues as to where she is and what’s happened to the mansion’s occupants. As Jennifer explores the mansion she encounters ‘Scissorman’, a terrifying, monstrous child who relentlessly chases after her with a giant pair of scissors.

5. A Boy and His Blob

5. A Boy and His Blob: A Boy and His Blob about a nameless boy who has teamed up with a jellybean loving, blob shaped alien from the planet Blobolonia, which is under the threat of an evil emperor. Together they must save Blobolonia, but it won’t be easy as there are obstacles to overcome at every turn. Luckily, every time the boy feeds the blob a jellybean the blob changes into a useful shape or tool according to the flavour, such as a trampoline or a ladder.

6. SEAMAN

6. SEAMAN: Virtual pets, especially the Tamagotchi, were all the rage in the 90s. Kids and teenagers alike were tied to the schedule of cute little electronic animals that lived in their pockets. Sega decided to apply this concept to the Dreamcast. Only, they took it in a completely different direction with Seaman which (when you can get over giggling like a 10-year-old about the name) features a fish with a human face. This probably isn’t what most people had in mind when they envisioned a virtual pet inhabiting their gaming console. Much like a Tamagotchi the Seaman has to be cared for and interacted with as it evolves, otherwise it will die. But this interaction is far removed from the kawaii style you get from a Tamagotchi. Instead, the player must talk to their nightmarish, virtual pet through a microphone. He talks back, via the voice of Leonard Nimoy, at first just asking simple questions, but then later progressing to full blown psychoanalysis. If the conversation doesn’t haunt you, the face will.

1. Katamari Damacy
2. Typing of the Dead
3. Golf Story
4. Clock Tower
5. A Boy and His Blob
6. SEAMAN
1. Katamari Damacy
1. Katamari Damacy: Katamari Damacy was created by artist and sculptor turned game designer, Keita Takahashi. The story goes like this: The King of the Cosmos had a bit too much to drink one night and destroyed the universe Now it falls on you to gather up everything using a sort of adhesive ball called a Katamari and restore the universe. It starts out small as your Katamari picks up household objects such as thumbtacks and paperclips but then progresses to much larger, more ridiculous things including cows and entire houses. Takahashi based the king’s physical appearance on Freddie Mercury and the game world he has created is both stylish and colourful.
2. Typing of the Dead
2. Typing of the Dead: There are not many games out there which utilise the PS2 and Dreamcast keyboards but if you’d like to try one out, Typing of the Dead is a great place to start. You’re under attack. There are hordes of zombies coming right towards you, but luckily you brought your most powerful weapon: your keyboard. That’s right, this is a horror learn-to-type game. To keep things interesting the zombies are all wielding keyboards too. Sentences you must type out include “I like peas” and “All your bases belong to us”.
3. Golf Story
3. Golf Story : Golf Story plays just like any other action RPG, but instead of worlds with different dungeons and towns to explore, there are golf courses with different terrains, other golfers to meet and side quests a plenty. Then there’s the combat: instead of fighting monsters with a sword (it’s dangerous to go alone!) or magic, you use a golf club. In fact, in the world of Golf Story there are very few problems which can’t be solved by hitting a golf ball at them. At first Golf Story feels like you are playing Mario Golf with JRPG-esque side quests, but as the game progresses the quests get weirder and weirder and soon you find yourself digging up golf courses (with a golf club, of course; as if you’d use a shovel) to look for buried treasure. Or using your precision golf ball hitting skills to defeat an undead army.
4. Clock Tower
4. Clock Tower: Imagine if Tim Burton and Dario Argento got together and created a point-and-click survival horror game. If they did, it would likely resemble Clock Tower, which feels like a blend of Phenomena and Edward Scissorhands. It centres around a Jennifer Connelly look alike who is an orphan adopted out and sent to live in a mansion known as The Clock Tower Upon arriving Jennifer quickly finds herself all alone. She must explore the spooky mansion and look for clues as to where she is and what’s happened to the mansion’s occupants. As Jennifer explores the mansion she encounters ‘Scissorman’, a terrifying, monstrous child who relentlessly chases after her with a giant pair of scissors.
5. A Boy and His Blob
5. A Boy and His Blob: A Boy and His Blob about a nameless boy who has teamed up with a jellybean loving, blob shaped alien from the planet Blobolonia, which is under the threat of an evil emperor. Together they must save Blobolonia, but it won’t be easy as there are obstacles to overcome at every turn. Luckily, every time the boy feeds the blob a jellybean the blob changes into a useful shape or tool according to the flavour, such as a trampoline or a ladder.
6. SEAMAN
6. SEAMAN: Virtual pets, especially the Tamagotchi, were all the rage in the 90s. Kids and teenagers alike were tied to the schedule of cute little electronic animals that lived in their pockets. Sega decided to apply this concept to the Dreamcast. Only, they took it in a completely different direction with Seaman which (when you can get over giggling like a 10-year-old about the name) features a fish with a human face. This probably isn’t what most people had in mind when they envisioned a virtual pet inhabiting their gaming console. Much like a Tamagotchi the Seaman has to be cared for and interacted with as it evolves, otherwise it will die. But this interaction is far removed from the kawaii style you get from a Tamagotchi. Instead, the player must talk to their nightmarish, virtual pet through a microphone. He talks back, via the voice of Leonard Nimoy, at first just asking simple questions, but then later progressing to full blown psychoanalysis. If the conversation doesn’t haunt you, the face will.