Milan Expo 2015 - see how 15 Arab nations will feed the future!

Published October 1st, 2015 - 18:53 GMT

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Milan is hosting a universal exhibition called Expo 2015 from May 1 through October 31. It's an occasional world fair where nations convene for a theme-based event, and this year’s concept is “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life". 

The Fertile Crescent, bridging ancient Mesopotamia and present-day Egypt, is where Sumerians, and later Mesopotamians, domesticated many of the wild plants which now form the basis of global food production. Arab Gulf states, grappling with water scarcity and harsh growing climates, are world leaders in innovative irrigation and hydroponics (farming without soil).   Continue reading below »

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Algeria describes a past where people used to hunting for food - in difficult arid terrain - developed systems to collect and distribute water using greenhouses and dams. Contemporary campaigns against deforestation, desertification and marine pollution are working to enhance future food security.
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Image 1 of 15:  1 / 15Algeria describes a past where people used to hunting for food - in difficult arid terrain - developed systems to collect and distribute water using greenhouses and dams. Contemporary campaigns against deforestation, desertification and marine pollution are working to enhance future food security.

Enlarge
Bahrain's agrarian history dates back 3,000 years to the ancient Dilmun civilization, supported by plentiful sweet water springs which still exist in this arid land. Legend says that the Garden of Eden was located in Bahrain. Their pavilion consists of 10 distinct fruit gardens, bearing different fruits during the six-month long Expo.
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Image 2 of 15:  2 / 15Bahrain's agrarian history dates back 3,000 years to the ancient Dilmun civilization, supported by plentiful sweet water springs which still exist in this arid land. Legend says that the Garden of Eden was located in Bahrain. Their pavilion consists of 10 distinct fruit gardens, bearing different fruits during the six-month long Expo.

Enlarge
Comoros, a four-island archipelago in the Indian Ocean, is a tiny food producer that serves it’s own population. With a maritime area of 16,000 km2, fishing is a potential source of growth for the nation's economy. Global trade events like Milan Expo encourage environmental and commercial partnerships to help realize a country's potential.
Reduce

Image 3 of 15:  3 / 15Comoros, a four-island archipelago in the Indian Ocean, is a tiny food producer that serves it’s own population. With a maritime area of 16,000 km2, fishing is a potential source of growth for the nation's economy. Global trade events like Milan Expo encourage environmental and commercial partnerships to help realize a country's potential.

Enlarge
The tropical Republic of Djibouti, located in the Horn of Africa, has a rich biodiversity mainly concentrated in coral reefs and mangrove forests. Facing climate change specific to arid areas, Djibouti created a national biotech lab to explore better cultivation of the date palm for its high-yielding output of fruits, seeds, firewood and timber.
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Image 4 of 15:  4 / 15The tropical Republic of Djibouti, located in the Horn of Africa, has a rich biodiversity mainly concentrated in coral reefs and mangrove forests. Facing climate change specific to arid areas, Djibouti created a national biotech lab to explore better cultivation of the date palm for its high-yielding output of fruits, seeds, firewood and timber.

Enlarge
Egypt emphasizes their historical trade relationships with other Mediterranean Basin nations. Their exhibit relays key historical events and Egyptian figures over millennia, relating each to the history of food. Egypt is a leader in renewable energy, but its agriculture is vulnerable to extreme drought and flooding caused by climate change.
Reduce

Image 5 of 15:  5 / 15Egypt emphasizes their historical trade relationships with other Mediterranean Basin nations. Their exhibit relays key historical events and Egyptian figures over millennia, relating each to the history of food. Egypt is a leader in renewable energy, but its agriculture is vulnerable to extreme drought and flooding caused by climate change.

Enlarge
Jordan enjoys rich food crop diversity; it's where Levant honeybees originated. But it's also the 2nd water-poorest country on earth. Wild plants and habitat are threatened by urbanization, tourism, and disregard of natural heritage sites and ecosystems. Their pavilion describes national efforts in biodiversity conservation.
Reduce

Image 6 of 15:  6 / 15Jordan enjoys rich food crop diversity; it's where Levant honeybees originated. But it's also the 2nd water-poorest country on earth. Wild plants and habitat are threatened by urbanization, tourism, and disregard of natural heritage sites and ecosystems. Their pavilion describes national efforts in biodiversity conservation.

Enlarge
Kuwait grapples with water, energy, and agriculture, aiming to align a better quality of life with sustainability. In 1953, they built the world's first desalination plant.  They now have seven plants producing 1.85 billion liters of water a day. Their agriculture focuses on cultivation of palms and potatoes.
Reduce

Image 7 of 15:  7 / 15Kuwait grapples with water, energy, and agriculture, aiming to align a better quality of life with sustainability. In 1953, they built the world's first desalination plant. They now have seven plants producing 1.85 billion liters of water a day. Their agriculture focuses on cultivation of palms and potatoes.

Enlarge
Lebanon’s exhibit revolves around the concept of food as an essential element of Lebanese culture. Food is used throughout the Milan Expo as a way of connecting countries with visitors.  Lebanon adds theatrical performances, cooking classes and documentaries, and constant tastings of typical dishes from this self-billed 'pearl of Arab cuisine.'
Reduce

Image 8 of 15:  8 / 15Lebanon’s exhibit revolves around the concept of food as an essential element of Lebanese culture. Food is used throughout the Milan Expo as a way of connecting countries with visitors. Lebanon adds theatrical performances, cooking classes and documentaries, and constant tastings of typical dishes from this self-billed "pearl of Arab cuisine."

Enlarge
Morocco also puts gastronomy at the core of its exhibit, showing agronomical features and cultural traditions from each of its different regions. Water access is also explored, showing how a combination of tradition and modernity applies to irrigation. Typical Moroccan produce includes argan oil, olive oil, saffron, local wines and honey.
Reduce

Image 9 of 15:  9 / 15Morocco also puts gastronomy at the core of its exhibit, showing agronomical features and cultural traditions from each of its different regions. Water access is also explored, showing how a combination of tradition and modernity applies to irrigation. Typical Moroccan produce includes argan oil, olive oil, saffron, local wines and honey.

Enlarge
Oman is one of the driest areas on earth. With 3,165 km of coastline, lapped by rugged mountains and punishing deserts, the sun-scorched Sultanate faces enormous challenges to sustainable and safe food production. Farms still depend largely on “aflaj”, ancient underground channels used for irrigation - five are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.
Reduce

Image 10 of 15:  10 / 15Oman is one of the driest areas on earth. With 3,165 km of coastline, lapped by rugged mountains and punishing deserts, the sun-scorched Sultanate faces enormous challenges to sustainable and safe food production. Farms still depend largely on “aflaj”, ancient underground channels used for irrigation - five are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Enlarge
Palestine has a rich historical relationship with the olive tree. It’s drought resistant and able to thrive in poor soil conditions, bearing fruit for thousands of years. Olives account for 70% of the country’s fruit production and contribute about 14% to their economy. Palestinian olives and olive oils are now reaching markets worldwide.
Reduce

Image 11 of 15:  11 / 15Palestine has a rich historical relationship with the olive tree. It’s drought resistant and able to thrive in poor soil conditions, bearing fruit for thousands of years. Olives account for 70% of the country’s fruit production and contribute about 14% to their economy. Palestinian olives and olive oils are now reaching markets worldwide.

Enlarge
Qatar is a desert country rich in oil and gas but water poor, and despite heavy investments in seawater desalination, it relies almost exclusively on imported food. Their pavilion showcases a rooftop garden and the latest technologies in hydroponics, where food is grown without soil and with minimal water in climate-controlled greenhouses.
Reduce

Image 12 of 15:  12 / 15Qatar is a desert country rich in oil and gas but water poor, and despite heavy investments in seawater desalination, it relies almost exclusively on imported food. Their pavilion showcases a rooftop garden and the latest technologies in hydroponics, where food is grown without soil and with minimal water in climate-controlled greenhouses.

Enlarge
Tunisia boasts naturally abundant olive groves, wheat fields, palms and forests. Its theme of “Enchanted Oasis”, a reference to the unusual and ancient seaside Oasis of Gabes where pomegranates, figs and almond trees have been grown for 3,000 years. Their pavilion explores the ways the nation will protect its resources, including its coast.
Reduce

Image 13 of 15:  13 / 15Tunisia boasts naturally abundant olive groves, wheat fields, palms and forests. Its theme of “Enchanted Oasis”, a reference to the unusual and ancient seaside Oasis of Gabes where pomegranates, figs and almond trees have been grown for 3,000 years. Their pavilion explores the ways the nation will protect its resources, including its coast.

Enlarge
UAE solutions to local food security have global application since many Middle Eastern nations face climate change and spiraling demand for water and energy. Their pavilion features 12m tall rippled walls that evoke the magnificent sand dunes of UAE deserts. It will be dismantled and rebuilt in Abu Dhabi's low-carbon Masdar City.
Reduce

Image 14 of 15:  14 / 15UAE solutions to local food security have global application since many Middle Eastern nations face climate change and spiraling demand for water and energy. Their pavilion features 12m tall rippled walls that evoke the magnificent sand dunes of UAE deserts. It will be dismantled and rebuilt in Abu Dhabi's low-carbon Masdar City.

Enlarge
Yemen’s economy was farm-based for over 3,000 years, and its coffee and honey production continue to fuel the nation despite civil strife. The country’s key role in commercializing coffee is often unrecognized, although brand 'Mocha Coffee' is totally Yemeni. The nation's unique Sidr honey is renowned for its flavor and medicinal qualities.
Reduce

Image 15 of 15:  15 / 15Yemen’s economy was farm-based for over 3,000 years, and its coffee and honey production continue to fuel the nation despite civil strife. The country’s key role in commercializing coffee is often unrecognized, although brand "Mocha Coffee" is totally Yemeni. The nation's unique Sidr honey is renowned for its flavor and medicinal qualities.

Enlarge

1

Algeria describes a past where people used to hunting for food - in difficult arid terrain - developed systems to collect and distribute water using greenhouses and dams. Contemporary campaigns against deforestation, desertification and marine pollution are working to enhance future food security.

Image 1 of 15Algeria describes a past where people used to hunting for food - in difficult arid terrain - developed systems to collect and distribute water using greenhouses and dams. Contemporary campaigns against deforestation, desertification and marine pollution are working to enhance future food security.

2

Bahrain's agrarian history dates back 3,000 years to the ancient Dilmun civilization, supported by plentiful sweet water springs which still exist in this arid land. Legend says that the Garden of Eden was located in Bahrain. Their pavilion consists of 10 distinct fruit gardens, bearing different fruits during the six-month long Expo.

Image 2 of 15Bahrain's agrarian history dates back 3,000 years to the ancient Dilmun civilization, supported by plentiful sweet water springs which still exist in this arid land. Legend says that the Garden of Eden was located in Bahrain. Their pavilion consists of 10 distinct fruit gardens, bearing different fruits during the six-month long Expo.

3

Comoros, a four-island archipelago in the Indian Ocean, is a tiny food producer that serves it’s own population. With a maritime area of 16,000 km2, fishing is a potential source of growth for the nation's economy. Global trade events like Milan Expo encourage environmental and commercial partnerships to help realize a country's potential.

Image 3 of 15Comoros, a four-island archipelago in the Indian Ocean, is a tiny food producer that serves it’s own population. With a maritime area of 16,000 km2, fishing is a potential source of growth for the nation's economy. Global trade events like Milan Expo encourage environmental and commercial partnerships to help realize a country's potential.

4

The tropical Republic of Djibouti, located in the Horn of Africa, has a rich biodiversity mainly concentrated in coral reefs and mangrove forests. Facing climate change specific to arid areas, Djibouti created a national biotech lab to explore better cultivation of the date palm for its high-yielding output of fruits, seeds, firewood and timber.

Image 4 of 15The tropical Republic of Djibouti, located in the Horn of Africa, has a rich biodiversity mainly concentrated in coral reefs and mangrove forests. Facing climate change specific to arid areas, Djibouti created a national biotech lab to explore better cultivation of the date palm for its high-yielding output of fruits, seeds, firewood and timber.

5

Egypt emphasizes their historical trade relationships with other Mediterranean Basin nations. Their exhibit relays key historical events and Egyptian figures over millennia, relating each to the history of food. Egypt is a leader in renewable energy, but its agriculture is vulnerable to extreme drought and flooding caused by climate change.

Image 5 of 15Egypt emphasizes their historical trade relationships with other Mediterranean Basin nations. Their exhibit relays key historical events and Egyptian figures over millennia, relating each to the history of food. Egypt is a leader in renewable energy, but its agriculture is vulnerable to extreme drought and flooding caused by climate change.

6

Jordan enjoys rich food crop diversity; it's where Levant honeybees originated. But it's also the 2nd water-poorest country on earth. Wild plants and habitat are threatened by urbanization, tourism, and disregard of natural heritage sites and ecosystems. Their pavilion describes national efforts in biodiversity conservation.

Image 6 of 15Jordan enjoys rich food crop diversity; it's where Levant honeybees originated. But it's also the 2nd water-poorest country on earth. Wild plants and habitat are threatened by urbanization, tourism, and disregard of natural heritage sites and ecosystems. Their pavilion describes national efforts in biodiversity conservation.

7

Kuwait grapples with water, energy, and agriculture, aiming to align a better quality of life with sustainability. In 1953, they built the world's first desalination plant.  They now have seven plants producing 1.85 billion liters of water a day. Their agriculture focuses on cultivation of palms and potatoes.

Image 7 of 15Kuwait grapples with water, energy, and agriculture, aiming to align a better quality of life with sustainability. In 1953, they built the world's first desalination plant. They now have seven plants producing 1.85 billion liters of water a day. Their agriculture focuses on cultivation of palms and potatoes.

8

Lebanon’s exhibit revolves around the concept of food as an essential element of Lebanese culture. Food is used throughout the Milan Expo as a way of connecting countries with visitors.  Lebanon adds theatrical performances, cooking classes and documentaries, and constant tastings of typical dishes from this self-billed 'pearl of Arab cuisine.'

Image 8 of 15Lebanon’s exhibit revolves around the concept of food as an essential element of Lebanese culture. Food is used throughout the Milan Expo as a way of connecting countries with visitors. Lebanon adds theatrical performances, cooking classes and documentaries, and constant tastings of typical dishes from this self-billed "pearl of Arab cuisine."

9

Morocco also puts gastronomy at the core of its exhibit, showing agronomical features and cultural traditions from each of its different regions. Water access is also explored, showing how a combination of tradition and modernity applies to irrigation. Typical Moroccan produce includes argan oil, olive oil, saffron, local wines and honey.

Image 9 of 15Morocco also puts gastronomy at the core of its exhibit, showing agronomical features and cultural traditions from each of its different regions. Water access is also explored, showing how a combination of tradition and modernity applies to irrigation. Typical Moroccan produce includes argan oil, olive oil, saffron, local wines and honey.

10

Oman is one of the driest areas on earth. With 3,165 km of coastline, lapped by rugged mountains and punishing deserts, the sun-scorched Sultanate faces enormous challenges to sustainable and safe food production. Farms still depend largely on “aflaj”, ancient underground channels used for irrigation - five are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Image 10 of 15Oman is one of the driest areas on earth. With 3,165 km of coastline, lapped by rugged mountains and punishing deserts, the sun-scorched Sultanate faces enormous challenges to sustainable and safe food production. Farms still depend largely on “aflaj”, ancient underground channels used for irrigation - five are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

11

Palestine has a rich historical relationship with the olive tree. It’s drought resistant and able to thrive in poor soil conditions, bearing fruit for thousands of years. Olives account for 70% of the country’s fruit production and contribute about 14% to their economy. Palestinian olives and olive oils are now reaching markets worldwide.

Image 11 of 15Palestine has a rich historical relationship with the olive tree. It’s drought resistant and able to thrive in poor soil conditions, bearing fruit for thousands of years. Olives account for 70% of the country’s fruit production and contribute about 14% to their economy. Palestinian olives and olive oils are now reaching markets worldwide.

12

Qatar is a desert country rich in oil and gas but water poor, and despite heavy investments in seawater desalination, it relies almost exclusively on imported food. Their pavilion showcases a rooftop garden and the latest technologies in hydroponics, where food is grown without soil and with minimal water in climate-controlled greenhouses.

Image 12 of 15Qatar is a desert country rich in oil and gas but water poor, and despite heavy investments in seawater desalination, it relies almost exclusively on imported food. Their pavilion showcases a rooftop garden and the latest technologies in hydroponics, where food is grown without soil and with minimal water in climate-controlled greenhouses.

13

Tunisia boasts naturally abundant olive groves, wheat fields, palms and forests. Its theme of “Enchanted Oasis”, a reference to the unusual and ancient seaside Oasis of Gabes where pomegranates, figs and almond trees have been grown for 3,000 years. Their pavilion explores the ways the nation will protect its resources, including its coast.

Image 13 of 15Tunisia boasts naturally abundant olive groves, wheat fields, palms and forests. Its theme of “Enchanted Oasis”, a reference to the unusual and ancient seaside Oasis of Gabes where pomegranates, figs and almond trees have been grown for 3,000 years. Their pavilion explores the ways the nation will protect its resources, including its coast.

14

UAE solutions to local food security have global application since many Middle Eastern nations face climate change and spiraling demand for water and energy. Their pavilion features 12m tall rippled walls that evoke the magnificent sand dunes of UAE deserts. It will be dismantled and rebuilt in Abu Dhabi's low-carbon Masdar City.

Image 14 of 15UAE solutions to local food security have global application since many Middle Eastern nations face climate change and spiraling demand for water and energy. Their pavilion features 12m tall rippled walls that evoke the magnificent sand dunes of UAE deserts. It will be dismantled and rebuilt in Abu Dhabi's low-carbon Masdar City.

15

Yemen’s economy was farm-based for over 3,000 years, and its coffee and honey production continue to fuel the nation despite civil strife. The country’s key role in commercializing coffee is often unrecognized, although brand 'Mocha Coffee' is totally Yemeni. The nation's unique Sidr honey is renowned for its flavor and medicinal qualities.

Image 15 of 15Yemen’s economy was farm-based for over 3,000 years, and its coffee and honey production continue to fuel the nation despite civil strife. The country’s key role in commercializing coffee is often unrecognized, although brand "Mocha Coffee" is totally Yemeni. The nation's unique Sidr honey is renowned for its flavor and medicinal qualities.

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So it's natural that 15 Arab nations are among the 170 country and corporate participants who are exploring food safety and security, innovation in the food supply chain, and technologies to advance agriculture and biodiversity.

Check out these Arab countries who are adding their voices to this global challenge. (And is there a reason that Saudi Arabia is not on the list?) 

 

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