Oman Reveals The Old Village Mystery Once Swallowed by The Desert

Published January 12th, 2021 - 08:29 GMT

The village of Wadi al-Murr in Oman existed ages ago. Today its former residents and visitors are still coming to rediscover the city which was once engulfed by the desert.

One local elder says: "All the houses in the village were invaded by the sand that assailed them 30 years ago, forcing the inhabitants to leave their homes."

Nevertheless, not all of the village was buried under the sand but some building tops and sections of the stone wall are still above the ground to prove people once living out there.

Moreover, Wadi al-Murr's original residents were forced to leave their homes after swelling the ranks of those migrating to towns and cities, according to AFP.

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Mohammed al-Ghanbousi, a former inhabitant of Wadi al-Murr, stands next to his abandoned house in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

Mohammed al-Ghanbousi, a former inhabitant of Wadi al-Murr, stands next to his abandoned house in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

The advance of the desert is not specific to the sultanate of Oman, and experts say climate change is one of the factors propelling the phenomenon in different parts of the world.  MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

The advance of the desert is not specific to the sultanate of Oman, and experts say climate change is one of the factors propelling the phenomenon in different parts of the world. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

This picture taken on December 31, 2020, shows the walls of an abandoned house in the Omani village of Wadi al-Murr, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

This picture taken on December 31, 2020, shows the walls of an abandoned house in the Omani village of Wadi al-Murr, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

Former inhabitants of Wadi al-Murr, gather near abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

Former inhabitants of Wadi al-Murr, gather near abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

The advance of the desert is not specific to the sultanate of Oman, and experts say climate change is one of the factors propelling the phenomenon in different parts of the world.  MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

The advance of the desert is not specific to the sultanate of Oman, and experts say climate change is one of the factors propelling the phenomenon in different parts of the world. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

This picture taken on December 31, 2020, shows abandoned houses in the Omani village of Wadi al-Murr, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

This picture taken on December 31, 2020, shows abandoned houses in the Omani village of Wadi al-Murr, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

Former inhabitants of Wadi al-Murr, walk near abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

Former inhabitants of Wadi al-Murr, walk near abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

Mohammed al-Ghanbousi, a former inhabitant of Wadi al-Murr, kneels to pray on a sand dune among abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

Mohammed al-Ghanbousi, a former inhabitant of Wadi al-Murr, kneels to pray on a sand dune among abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP

Mohammed al-Ghanbousi, a former inhabitant of Wadi al-Murr, stands next to his abandoned house in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
The advance of the desert is not specific to the sultanate of Oman, and experts say climate change is one of the factors propelling the phenomenon in different parts of the world.  MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
This picture taken on December 31, 2020, shows the walls of an abandoned house in the Omani village of Wadi al-Murr, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
Former inhabitants of Wadi al-Murr, gather near abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
The advance of the desert is not specific to the sultanate of Oman, and experts say climate change is one of the factors propelling the phenomenon in different parts of the world.  MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
This picture taken on December 31, 2020, shows abandoned houses in the Omani village of Wadi al-Murr, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
Former inhabitants of Wadi al-Murr, walk near abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
Mohammed al-Ghanbousi, a former inhabitant of Wadi al-Murr, kneels to pray on a sand dune among abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
Mohammed al-Ghanbousi, a former inhabitant of Wadi al-Murr, stands next to his abandoned house in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
Mohammed al-Ghanbousi, a former inhabitant of Wadi al-Murr, stands next to his abandoned house in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
The advance of the desert is not specific to the sultanate of Oman, and experts say climate change is one of the factors propelling the phenomenon in different parts of the world.  MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
The advance of the desert is not specific to the sultanate of Oman, and experts say climate change is one of the factors propelling the phenomenon in different parts of the world. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
This picture taken on December 31, 2020, shows the walls of an abandoned house in the Omani village of Wadi al-Murr, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
This picture taken on December 31, 2020, shows the walls of an abandoned house in the Omani village of Wadi al-Murr, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
Former inhabitants of Wadi al-Murr, gather near abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
Former inhabitants of Wadi al-Murr, gather near abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
The advance of the desert is not specific to the sultanate of Oman, and experts say climate change is one of the factors propelling the phenomenon in different parts of the world.  MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
The advance of the desert is not specific to the sultanate of Oman, and experts say climate change is one of the factors propelling the phenomenon in different parts of the world. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
This picture taken on December 31, 2020, shows abandoned houses in the Omani village of Wadi al-Murr, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
This picture taken on December 31, 2020, shows abandoned houses in the Omani village of Wadi al-Murr, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
Former inhabitants of Wadi al-Murr, walk near abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
Former inhabitants of Wadi al-Murr, walk near abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. Encroaching desert sands have left little evidence that Wadi al-Murr ever existed, but former inhabitants, while resigned to its destruction, are trying to preserve its memory. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
Mohammed al-Ghanbousi, a former inhabitant of Wadi al-Murr, kneels to pray on a sand dune among abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP
Mohammed al-Ghanbousi, a former inhabitant of Wadi al-Murr, kneels to pray on a sand dune among abandoned houses in the Omani village, about 400 kms (250 miles) southwest of the capital Muscat, on December 31, 2020. MOHAMMED MAHJOUB / AFP