Tunisia Opens Market for Edible Flowers

Published February 19th, 2021 - 06:31 GMT

Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes.

Tunisian chef Bassem Bizid uses edible flowers to prepare his dishes at a luxury hotel in Gammarth, an upscale northern suburb of the capital Tunis, on February 5, 2021.

But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.

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Tunisian chef Bassem Bizid uses edible flowers to prepare his dishes at a luxury hotel in Gammarth, an upscale northern suburb of the capital Tunis, on February 5, 2021. FETHI BELAID / AFP

Tunisian chef Bassem Bizid uses edible flowers to prepare his dishes at a luxury hotel in Gammarth, an upscale northern suburb of the capital Tunis, on February 5, 2021. FETHI BELAID / AFP

Sonia Ibidhi, a 42-year-old journalist turned to organic farming, tastes some petals in the greenhouse of her small farm where she produces edible flowers, in the northwestern Tunisian coastal town of Tabarka, on Januray 28, 2021.FETHI BELAID / AFP

Sonia Ibidhi, a 42-year-old journalist turned to organic farming, tastes some petals in the greenhouse of her small farm where she produces edible flowers, in the northwestern Tunisian coastal town of Tabarka, on Januray 28, 2021.FETHI BELAID / AFP

Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP

Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty. FETHI BELAID / AFP

Sonia Ibidhi, a 42-year-old journalist turned to organic farming, cares for potted plants in the greenhouse of her small farm where she produces edible flowers, in the northwestern Tunisian coastal town of Tabarka, on Januray 28, 2021. FETHI BELAID / AFP

Sonia Ibidhi, a 42-year-old journalist turned to organic farming, cares for potted plants in the greenhouse of her small farm where she produces edible flowers, in the northwestern Tunisian coastal town of Tabarka, on Januray 28, 2021. FETHI BELAID / AFP

But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP

But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty. FETHI BELAID / AFP

Tunisian chef Bassem Bizid uses edible flowers to prepare his dishes at a luxury hotel in Gammarth, an upscale northern suburb of the capital Tunis, on February 5, 2021. Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP

Tunisian chef Bassem Bizid uses edible flowers to prepare his dishes at a luxury hotel in Gammarth, an upscale northern suburb of the capital Tunis, on February 5, 2021. Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty. FETHI BELAID / AFP

Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP

Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty. FETHI BELAID / AFP

Tunisian chef Bassem Bizid uses edible flowers to prepare his dishes at a luxury hotel in Gammarth, an upscale northern suburb of the capital Tunis, on February 5, 2021. FETHI BELAID / AFP
Sonia Ibidhi, a 42-year-old journalist turned to organic farming, tastes some petals in the greenhouse of her small farm where she produces edible flowers, in the northwestern Tunisian coastal town of Tabarka, on Januray 28, 2021.FETHI BELAID / AFP
Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP
Sonia Ibidhi, a 42-year-old journalist turned to organic farming, cares for potted plants in the greenhouse of her small farm where she produces edible flowers, in the northwestern Tunisian coastal town of Tabarka, on Januray 28, 2021. FETHI BELAID / AFP
But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP
Tunisian chef Bassem Bizid uses edible flowers to prepare his dishes at a luxury hotel in Gammarth, an upscale northern suburb of the capital Tunis, on February 5, 2021. Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP
Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP
Tunisian chef Bassem Bizid uses edible flowers to prepare his dishes at a luxury hotel in Gammarth, an upscale northern suburb of the capital Tunis, on February 5, 2021. FETHI BELAID / AFP
Tunisian chef Bassem Bizid uses edible flowers to prepare his dishes at a luxury hotel in Gammarth, an upscale northern suburb of the capital Tunis, on February 5, 2021. FETHI BELAID / AFP
Sonia Ibidhi, a 42-year-old journalist turned to organic farming, tastes some petals in the greenhouse of her small farm where she produces edible flowers, in the northwestern Tunisian coastal town of Tabarka, on Januray 28, 2021.FETHI BELAID / AFP
Sonia Ibidhi, a 42-year-old journalist turned to organic farming, tastes some petals in the greenhouse of her small farm where she produces edible flowers, in the northwestern Tunisian coastal town of Tabarka, on Januray 28, 2021.FETHI BELAID / AFP
Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP
Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty. FETHI BELAID / AFP
Sonia Ibidhi, a 42-year-old journalist turned to organic farming, cares for potted plants in the greenhouse of her small farm where she produces edible flowers, in the northwestern Tunisian coastal town of Tabarka, on Januray 28, 2021. FETHI BELAID / AFP
Sonia Ibidhi, a 42-year-old journalist turned to organic farming, cares for potted plants in the greenhouse of her small farm where she produces edible flowers, in the northwestern Tunisian coastal town of Tabarka, on Januray 28, 2021. FETHI BELAID / AFP
But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP
But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty. FETHI BELAID / AFP
Tunisian chef Bassem Bizid uses edible flowers to prepare his dishes at a luxury hotel in Gammarth, an upscale northern suburb of the capital Tunis, on February 5, 2021. Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP
Tunisian chef Bassem Bizid uses edible flowers to prepare his dishes at a luxury hotel in Gammarth, an upscale northern suburb of the capital Tunis, on February 5, 2021. Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty. FETHI BELAID / AFP
Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty.  FETHI BELAID / AFP
Tunisians already use certain flowers in their traditional cuisine. Some sweets feature dried rose petals, while lavender is an ingredient in a spice mix used in couscous recipes. But fresh flowers, which can be used for dishes from soups to salads as well as teas, are a novelty. FETHI BELAID / AFP