Snapchat takes on Beirut

Published April 2nd, 2016 - 04:00 GMT
Yesterday's live snapchat story from Beirut showed a city that was, well, just a little bit obsessed with Lebanon's national anthem, amongst other things.  (File)
Yesterday's live snapchat story from Beirut showed a city that was, well, just a little bit obsessed with Lebanon's national anthem, amongst other things. (File)

Snapchat's Beirut story: AUB, national anthem, Ain el Mreisse, national anthem, fattit shrimps  

Here are some of the things we learned in this story:
– Beirut’s logo is a mosque for some reason.
– Beirut is all about Ain el Mraisse, AUB and Beirut Souks.
– Maamoul is a national dessert (which we feed to pets as well).
– Fattit Shrimps is a traditional dish (local secrets).
– We sing the National Anthem everywhere we go.
– There are clowns in Beirut distributing balloons to cars rocking Ali el Deek.
– Everyone speaks English in Beirut except that motorist with his “Assalam 3alaykoum” greeting.

Continue reading on Blog Baladi

  

Q&A with eL Seed: changing perceptions  

The Coptic community of Zaraeeb have been given the name zabaleen (or garbage people) because of their profession — collecting and sorting by hand the daily rubbish of Cairo. But the recycling work they carry out is not only highly profitable — it is a vital service in a city that produces around 14,000 tons of solid waste daily. For this reason the people of Zaraeeb don’t see themselves as the dirty ones — the real mess is Greater Cairo. It’s a matter of perception.

Continue reading on Mada Masr

 

Being Syrian 

I don't know what it means to be Syrian anymore, and when I think about it, I doubt that I ever did. Syria was never *my* country. I lived there for a while, I visited during the summer vacations, I had a life there once, a long time ago, but what does that all mean? Does that make me Syrian? Or is it that my parents are Syrian? When the Syrian revolution started I had no idea so many people existed there, that there were so many towns and villages and places that I'd never even heard of.

Continue reading on Maysaloon

 

 

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