N. Korea Missile Launch Photos Digitally Edited, Show the Wrong Star Constellations

N. Korea Missile Launch Photos Digitally Edited, Show the Wrong Star Constellations
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Published December 5th, 2017 - 13:40 GMT via SyndiGate.info

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North Korea launched the Hwasong-15 ICBM on Nov. 29, and it traveled 600 miles before it broke apart in the air and landed in waters near Japan (AFP)
North Korea launched the Hwasong-15 ICBM on Nov. 29, and it traveled 600 miles before it broke apart in the air and landed in waters near Japan (AFP)
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North Korea has been accused of digitally altering photographs of its latest nuclear missile test-launch.

Images of the launch of the  Hwasong-15 intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) show it being blasted off into the night against a starry sky - but there are inconsistencies in the photos.

Photos supposedly taken from the same angle show different star constellations in the background, an expert claims.

It is not known why North Korea would alter their images, but it is thought it could be purely for aesthetic reasons.

Academic Dr. Marco Langbroek spotted the differences between the images and tweeted comparisons of two photos taken from the same viewpoint. 

'So, I just discovered that the North Koreans DID tamper with their #Hwasong15 launch photo's! Two images from clearly same viewpoint, but dramatically different star backgrounds! Orion (Southeast) versus Andromeda (Northwest)!'

 

 

Dr. Langbroek, based in Leiden, The Netherlands, also pointed out that in one of the images, the Sirius star is missing from the Canis Major constellation.

'You should see constellations that are opposites in the sky. That is not the case,' Dr. Langbroek told CNN.

North Korea launched the Hwasong-15 ICBM on Nov. 29, and it traveled 600 miles before it broke apart in the air and landed in waters near Japan.

While it is thought it could have the potential of striking targets as far as 8,100 miles away, analysts agree that Pyongyang may not have yet mastered all the technology required to successfully hit the U.S. with a nuclear warhead.

 

 


This article has been adapted from its original source.

© Associated Newspapers Ltd.

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