Expenses $2.8 Million: Ilhan Omar Pays Husband For Election Cycle

Published November 11th, 2020 - 10:38 GMT
Congressional candidate Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) speaks during a get out the vote event on the University of Minnesota campus on November 3, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (AFP/File Photo)
Congressional candidate Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) speaks during a get out the vote event on the University of Minnesota campus on November 3, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (AFP/File Photo)
Highlights
Money made up two thirds of her total campaign expenses in that time period .

Ilhan Omar paid her husband's company $2.8million during the 2019-2020 election cycle, campaign finance records show. 

The Democrat congresswoman paid husband Tim Mynett's eStreet Group $1.6million between 2019 and July 22 this year, another $1.1million between July 22 and the end of September, and has paid an additional $27,000 since then.

The majority of the money has been spent on digital advertising, FEC records show, but charges also include consultancy fees and more than $2,700 in travel expenses.

The two largest payments in recent months were $404,338.75 paid on July 7 for digital advertising, and another $289,759.58 on July 24 for cable advertising.


Between the start of July and mid-October - the latest date that records are available - Omar has paid eStreet Group a total of $86,500 for 'digital consulting' and 'fundraising consulting'.

Other expenses include video production and editing and website production.

Mynett began working for Omar during the 2018 election - which she won by a landslide, running in a safe seat.

It is not known when Omar and Mynett, who were both married at the time, began their affair.

However, a divorce filing by Mynett's wife revealed the couple separated in April 2019 when he declared his love for Omar.

Mynett and his wife, who had been together since 2006 and have a 13-year-old son, got divorced in December last year after seven years of marriage.

Meanwhile Omar's husband Ahmed Hirsi - whom she married in 2002 in an Islamic ceremony before remarrying him in a legally binding union in 2018 - divorced her in November last year. 

Omar, a member of the Democrat 'Squad' on Capitol Hill, easily won reelection to Minnesota's 5th district on November 3. 

 

She took almost 65 per cent of the ballot, compared to Republican challenger Lacey Johnson's 26 per cent.

Omar's other squadmates - Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Talib and Ayanna Pressley - also won reelection.

Despite polls suggesting the Democrats were on-course to expand their majority in the house, in fact they lost seats - though retain overall control.

That has led to fears that the 'squad' will hold an outsized presence on the Hill, pressuring the party to shift politically to the left.

Omar and Mynett announced they had married on Instagram in March this year, after they were pictured together wearing rings by Dailymail.com.

The marriage is Omar's third. After wedding Hirsi in 2002, she then married Ahmed Elmi in a civil ceremony in 2009.

The pair split in 2011 and officially divorced in 2017, when she remarried Hirsi.

There is speculation that Elmi is actually Omar's brother, and that the marriage was part of an immigration scam that saw him gain funding to attend North Dakota State University. The issue is currently being probed by the FBI.

Payments from Omar to Mynett's company have also been the subject of at least one ethics complaint, but appear to be above-board.

Omar released a length Twitter statement on the issue back in March, saying the couple had discussed their relationship with an FEC attorney, who told them it was permitted under the law.

Sixties-era federal anti-nepotism laws prohibit politicians from giving jobs to family members, but do not block relatives from doing campaign work.

Richard Painter, chief ethics lawyer to George W. Bush, said back in July: 'It should not be allowed.

'I think it’s a horrible idea to allow it, given the amount of money that goes into these campaigns from special interests.' 

This article has been adapted from its original source.


© Associated Newspapers Ltd.

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