Australian Online Privacy Bill to Mandate Age Verification on Social Media

Published October 25th, 2021 - 01:13 GMT
Australian Online Privacy Bill to Mandate Age Verification on Social Media
This proposed legal crackdown come in the light of Frances Haugen's latest leaks which showed the public that the social media giant only cares about its own interests. (Shutterstock)
Highlights
Named Online Privacy Bill, the law aims at toughening the penalties on privacy breaches and its effects on teens and children.

The Australian government has revealed plans to draft a new law that will mandate age verification on social media platforms such a Reddit and Facebook.

Australia Vs Social Media

Named Online Privacy Bill, the law aims at toughening the penalties on privacy breaches and its effects on teens and children.

Social media

This proposed legal crackdown come in the light of Frances Haugen's latest leaks which showed the public that the social media giant only cares about its own interests.

Assistant Minister for Mental Health and Suicide Prevention David Coleman commented:

"Facebook's own internal research demonstrates the impact social media platforms can have on body image and the mental health of young people".

Under the new law, social media giant companies are required to obtain parental approval for users under the age of 16, with multimillion-dollar fines for firms that fail to comply.

If the law gets the green light, it will hike up the current fine from $2.1 million up to $7.5 million or 10% of the company's domestic annual turnover.

Recently, Facebook has announced a set of new control features for parents to supervise what their teens and children are viewing online on their platforms including Instagram. Also, the tech giant has announced in a blog the pause of the Instagram Kids app project amid widespread backlash from US lawmakers, activists, and parents.

Back in September, The Australian high court has ruled that news outlets can be held accountable and sued for defamatory social media third-party comments by their readers. The ruling means that any publisher based in Australia can be sued for any disparaging or hateful comments by readers even if they weren't aware of the comment.

 


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