Overtime Ramadan Pay in UAE: All You Need to Know

Published April 3rd, 2022 - 10:19 GMT
Overtime Ramadan Pay in UAE: All You Need to Know
The overtime is calculated upon the gross salary (basic pay plus allowances). (Shutterstock)

If you're working in the UAE's private sector, and you're wondering whether you're eligible for an overtime Ramadan pay, then we have the answer for you.

As per the UAE's Ministry of Human Resources and Emiratisation (the ‘MOHRE’)'s rules, the hours of working for private sector is reduced by two hours during the holy month of Ramadan. In addition, Article 15 (2) of the Cabinet Resolution No. 1 of 2022 on Employment Relations states that "Normal working hours shall be reduced by (2) two hours during the holy month of Ramadan."

However, businesses such as hotels, restaurants, and hospitals may require staff to work longer hours. So the question in such cases is: Are these employees eligible for an overtime pay?

As per the UAE's laws, your employer may employ you for additional working hours during Ramadan, provided such overtime should not exceed two hours in a day, unless the work is necessary to avoid any serious loss or accident. The total number of working hours may not extend more than 144 hours in three weeks. This is in accordance with Article 15 (3) of the Cabinet Resolution No. 1 of 2022.

The overtime is calculated upon the gross salary (basic pay plus allowances).

People who are permanently on late shift, such as airport and hospital employees, and if their working hours were mentioned in the contract and agreed upon, are not entitled to extra pay for such shifts. However, they will be entitled to overtime if they work longer hours during Ramadan.

The following categories are excluded from the provisions of maximum working hours, and therefor are not entitled to the overtime Ramadan pay:

  • Persons holding supervisory positions, if such positions give their holders powers of the Employer
  • Works whose technical nature necessitates the continuation of work through consecutive shifts, provided that the average working hours per week do not exceed (56) hours.”

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