British Tourist Falls to His Death at Whale-Watching Clifftop in Australia

Published July 23rd, 2018 - 12:24 GMT
(Shutterstock/File Photo)
(Shutterstock/File Photo)

 A British tourist has fallen to his death from a popular whale-watching clifftop in Australia.

The 18-year-old man was reportedly taking a selfie with friends at Cape Solander, south of Sydney when he lost his balance and plunged 30ft into the sea below at 3.30pm local time.

His shell-shocked friends were unable to reach where he had landed and made desperate phone calls to police.

A lifesaver helicopter arrived in seven minutes and crews put green dye in the water to trace the current to find the man.

They found him unconscious just below the surface after 30 minutes in the water.

Lifeguards on jet-skis pulled him from the waves and put him in a police boat from where he was winched to dry land - but paramedics could not revive him with CPR and he was pronounced dead at the scene.

 

 

The teenager has not been formally identified. Police are in the process of telling his family, a police spokesman said Australia.

The man, understood to be part of a religious group, was reportedly with 15 others on holiday.

It is thought the group of teenagers walked down from an official viewing platform to a slippery rocky ledge nearer the water.

The Daily Telegraph reported the man was taking a selfie when he fell.

'He was here with a group of friends to go whale watching. They've made their way down onto the rock platform at this stage it appears to be misadventure where he's slipped and fallen over the edge,' New South Wales Police Chief Inspector Chris Hill said.

He added: 'If you are attending this location, those rocks are very slippery so for your safety, stay up on the whale watching platform and please don't go down on the rocks.'

In early June another man fell to his death while taking photos in the same area, which is popular for watching migrating whales.

The cliffs, next to Kamay Botany Bay National Park, are among the best places see humpbacks migrate north to warmer Queensland in the winter.

The National Parks NSW website describes the area as 'an unbeatable lookout during whale watching season'.

'If you're lucky you won't even need to look far — whales have been known to swim as close as 200m from the coast,' the site reads.

 

This article has been adapted from its original source.


© Associated Newspapers Ltd.

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